Jenny Redfearn

What does it take to be a leader in Health and Social Care? Level 5 apprentice, Jenny Redfearn, tells us about leaving school at 16 and tackling the professional qualifications she needed to accelerate her career.

Jenny's story

Level 5 Health and Social Care apprentice, Jenny Redfearn, is a therapeutic care worker.

With her advanced qualifications in her back pocket, she's prepped for a promotion and has her eyes on the prize - a senior role in her setting. In this interview, she talks about learning to be a leader during a lockdown, leaving school at 16 and building up her skillset in the workplace.

Jenny's Training Advisor, Hayley Lewis, said:

Jenny is a Therapeutic Care Worker for Marlowe St David’s, working with young people with complex needs who are in the child looked after system. As part of Jenny’s development plan she was asked to carry out a shift leading role so she gains skill in her leadership for a future position within the setting as a Senior Therapeutic Care Worker. 

Jenny has been on programme with her Leadership in Health and Social Care Children and Young People (Advance Practice) since June 2021. She has faced many barriers since starting, mainly Covid-19. She is a key worker and continued to work throughout the pandemic, often needing to cover shifts if or when colleagues have had to self-isolate.

She was unable to access face to face learning for a number of months when she first started her Higher Apprenticeship, however, this has not prevented her from remaining focused and committed throughout.

Her work has always been of a very high standard and she has embraced all the feedback I have provided her so she develops her skills and knowledge of the principles and values of health and social care and the legislation, national policies and Codes of Conduct and Practice.

She is a role model to others in her setting, both with her practice when working with the young people and as part of a multi-agency approach and embracing new opportunities to continue developing her professional development in order to develop her own career progress.

Her learning has had a positive impact on her confidence within her role when working with vulnerable young people when forming positive bonds and attachment and as a shift leader, supporting her team to gain the skills she has learnt to support their career progression.